Caribbean Festival Arts

One of the many festivals presented in this exhibition catalog is the Jonkonnu Festival celebrated in Jamaica. Here is part of the troupe from the Kingston area, performing at the National Festival in August 1984. Characters typical of a Roots troupe are (left to right) Cowhead, Pitch Patchy, Horsehead and Devil. 

One of the many festivals presented in this exhibition catalog is the Jonkonnu Festival celebrated in Jamaica. Here is part of the troupe from the Kingston area, performing at the National Festival in August 1984. Characters typical of a Roots troupe are (left to right) Cowhead, Pitch Patchy, Horsehead and Devil. 

1988. CARIBBEAN FESTIVAL ARTS: CO-AUTHORED BY JUDITH BETTELHEIM AND JOHN NUNLEY (SEATTLE: THE SAINT LOUIS ART MUSEUM AND UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON PRESS) 250 PP. 166 ILLUS., GLOSSARY, BIBLIOGRAPHY

The exhibition included mannequins in full costumes, music, video, and explanatory wall text. The individual mannequins were cast from real people so that distinctive characteristics, such as musculature were preserved. Many major festivals and their diasporic diffusion both inter-island and in the metropole were represented. Carnival- like celebrations in Jamaica and related festivals in Bermuda, St. Kitts, Belize were included.  A section of the famous Sailor Bands and a discussion of Peter Minshall’s work represented Trinidad Mas.  Both historical photographs and contemporary sculptural and architectural structures represent the Muslim Hosay celebration in Trinidad.  Carnival in Cuba, Rara in Haiti and the Mardi Gras Indians of New Orleans each became part of the visual and historical landscape of the Caribbean.  In the publication each case study includes historical photographs combined with full color contemporary images.  Special essays by Robert Farris Thompson and Rex Nettleford elucidate many of the exhibition themes. The exhibition traveled to six venues.

Purchase book from Amazon.